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Fall Bulbs

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Fall bulbs aren't really well 'fall bulbs' - it's only called that because we plant them in fall for a spring display.  And what's more, some of these fall 'bulbs' are technically not bulbs at all, they are corms, tubers or rhizomes.  But that's going real technical and most of us common folk just lump them into the category of 'fall bulbs' after all what's intended is for the effect that they give us at the end and classifying them taxonimically isn't something most people are concerned about.

The most commonly planted fall bulbs would be tulips, daffodils, irises and hyacinths.  And as their name suggests, fall is the time to plant them so that they can stay dormant in the cold winter soil (some of these bulbs require a cold snap to bloom well in spring - notably your tulips) and then burst into bloom to herald the arrival of spring!  Some gardeners just use their trowels to dig a hole to plant the bulbs whilst others use a specialized tool called a bulb planter to help with the task.  Still others who can't naturalize the bulbs in their garden will use netting, dig a trench and then place the netting in the soil, refill with well rotted compost and then create holes to plant the bulbs - this makes for easy removal later on after they are past their peak bloom time, you just life the netting and up come the bulbs with no chance of one stray one being left behind!

Fall bulbs need to be planted out about 4-6 weeks before you get frost in your garden.  Most bulbs adore sunlight although you will get some that can cope with the dappled light under deciduous trees.  Ensure that the soil is light and well drained otherwise your bulbs will rot in the ground.

Flower pots home>gardening articles>fall bulbs

fall bulbs
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